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This is weirdly interesting to me

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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby Farsight » Sat Feb 01, 2014 12:18 pm

You want to talk to Andrew Worsley aka HQT about harmonics. He wrote Harmonic quintessence and the derivation of the charge and mass of the electron and the proton and quark masses. That's in Physics Essays Jun 2011, Vol. 24, No. 2 pp. 240-253. See this web page. He’s applying "spherical harmonics", usually applied to electron orbitals, to the particles themselves. Look at this depiction of a spindle-sphere torus and imagine an "equatorial" rotation going round at c and another orthogonal "polar" rotation at ½c:

Image
Image credit Adrian Rossiter, see http://www.antiprism.com/album/860_tori/index.html

This rotation is reminiscent of a moebius strip, which you can "inflate" to give the Williaamson / van der Mark electron, which you can "inflate" further to the spindle-sphere torus. IMHO this fits what we know about the electron. It has a spherically symmetric electromagnetic field, and is a spin ½ particle where 720 degrees are required to return to the original state. Andrew gives the electron Compton wavelength as λ = 4π / n c^1½ metres, where n is a dimensionality conversion factor with a value of 1. Here's the numbers:

4π = 12.566370
c = 299792458
c^½ = 17314.5158177
4π / c^1½ = 12.566370 / (299792458 * 17314.5158177)
λ = 2.420910 x 10ˉ¹² m
Actual = 2.426310 x 10ˉ¹² m

There's a binding energy adjustment, but it's small.
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby myusersname » Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:38 pm

Awesome thanks for the link!
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby inertron » Sat Feb 01, 2014 4:58 pm

In the case of sound/music, a tone produced by one string can cause another string to vibrate sympathetically if it is tuned to the same frequency or an 'octave' of that frequency. It would be interesting if such sympathetic vibration would explain resonances between photons and the electrons of absorbers/emitters. This could explain emissions/absorption spectra in terms of the tendency of one frequency of light to scatter into others and sympathetically resonate with other frequencies, etc. In music, this would be akin to a high C note being played and causing sympathetic vibrations of a lower C note, only as far as I know in music, one note/frequency can't scatter into other notes/frequencies when the wave interacts with various other strings of different tensions. Since emissions/absorption spectra are complex, I don't know if the analogy with music would hold very well or whether some other resonance-rules could explain a similar pattern of interactions that nonetheless operate differently because the waves are electromagnetic instead of acoustic.
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby myusersname » Sat Feb 01, 2014 8:02 pm

inertron wrote:It would be interesting if such sympathetic vibration would explain resonances between photons and the electrons of absorbers/emitters. This could explain emissions/absorption spectra in terms of the tendency of one frequency of light to scatter into others and sympathetically resonate with other frequencies, etc. In music, this would be akin to a high C note being played and causing sympathetic vibrations of a lower C note, only as far as I know in music, one note/frequency can't scatter into other notes/frequencies when the wave interacts with various other strings of different tensions.


Yes that came to my mind as well.


I don't know if the analogy with music would hold very well or whether some other resonance-rules could explain a similar pattern of interactions that nonetheless operate differently because the waves are electromagnetic instead of acoustic.


Again I am not sure, I suppose it would depend on the medium. We can make EM wave from acoustic waves so there may be some relation. I've seen HQT make a post on another thread, perhaps he could enlighten us here as well. I still need to go over the link Farsight provided.
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby myusersname » Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:17 pm

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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby Chevy106 » Thu Aug 07, 2014 10:22 pm

To me it looks like an omnitrucated 16 cell tesseract would look like in higher dimensional space. The animation would show its structure in different states. I'd dare say its action could be a condition of gravity bending around the object, with gravimetric forces changing as you went further down its strata. But with little knowledge of how gravity actually works in higher dimensions, I digress.

For the record I hate explaining things in terms of gravity. Every time I do, I feel I have to take a hot shower.

:0P
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby myusersname » Sun Oct 23, 2016 4:10 am

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-planet-nine-new-evidence-20161022-snap-story.html


"Now, a team led by Renu Malhotra, a planetary scientist at the University of Arizona, has examined the orbits of four extreme Kuiper belt objects with the longest-known orbital periods and found an elegant relationship among their orbits: They can be described essentially in simple, whole-number ratios. This suggests that they’re pulled into these resonances by the gravity from an unseen massive object. (Neptune could not be to blame, because these objects’ orbits take them well beyond the ice giant’s influence.)"

Sumbitch
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Re: This is weirdly interesting to me

Postby wlminex » Fri Apr 21, 2017 1:25 am

Perhaps there is a budding new Pythagorean out-there who can examine those ratios and make some geometric sense of them.
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